Tag Archives: television

A Redhead With A Leopard-Print Handbag

Colored glamorous shot of Lucille Ball and Arnaz standing.A true blast from the past has been lurking in the back of my brain lately, an episode of I Love Lucy© from December 17, 1955 titled: The Passports.

If by some strange turn of events you’ve never-ever seen this episode (perhaps you’ve been off-world on an exploratory trip to Alpha Centauri), this is the episode where, after finagling a tag-along trip to Europe with Ricky, Lucy finds that she doesn’t have the necessary documents to get a passport. In addition, she’s somehow misplaced the only blood relative who can vouch for her… her mother.

Long story short, after finding that there is no record of her birth in her home town, she goes through the motions of trying to find someone older than her, who knew her as a child.

Lucy locates Helen Ericson Sears Kaiser, the woman who babysat Lucy as a child, only to be stymied when Helen won’t admit her real age in front of her husband. With Helen explaining the situation to her husband in some truly irritating baby talk, all the while calling him ‘daddy’ (Ack! I’m sure I coughed up a hairball during that scene!), the story gets twisted around until Helen and her husband decide that, of course, Lucy was the babysitter, and Helen the child.

[Lucy Trivia: the leopard-print handbag in the photo above made appearances in several I Love Lucy© episodes. Sometimes it belonged to Lucy. Sometimes it belonged to Ethel. But I think that I would luv to have that handbag most of all.]

Determined to make the European tour by any means possible, Lucy decides to stowaway on board the ship in Fred and Ethel’s old vaudeville trunk – a trunk that had been purchased from a man with a seal act, ergo the handy air-hole for ventilation. Lucy tries the trunk on for size, and of course the trunk locks, and of course the key to the trunk is in the pocket of the skirt that Lucy is wearing.

Just then, the doorbell rings, and who should walk in? Why it’s old Doc Peterson, the man who delivered Lucy in (West) Jamestown, NY.

At last, somebody who can identify Lucy! But Lucy’s still locked in that darned trunk…

  • Dr. Peterson: (speaking to Ethel) I couldn’t sign anything until I’m sure that she’s really Lucille McGillicuddy.
  • Lucy: (from inside the trunk) Oh, no.  I am, Dr. Peterson, I am. I’m Lucille McGillicuddy.
  • Dr. Peterson: Well, I don’t know. Uh, I thought she (points at Ethel) was you at first.
  • Ethel: Oh, no, now, you could see her. (points to the hole in the trunk) There’s a hole right there in the trunk. You look right through there, you can see that that’s Lucy.
  • Dr. Peterson: Well, I’ll take a look. (Bends down and looks through the hole in the trunk) Hi… I can’t tell a thing.
  • Lucy: Oh, now, wait a minute, Doc. Wait a minute. (from inside the trunk, Lucy puts one eye up to the hole) Here’s one of my eyes. Here’s my other eye. Here’s my nose. Here’s my mouth. Put them all together and they spell Lucille McGillicuddy!
  • Dr. Peterson: All that is, is an eye, an eye, a nose and a mouth.

Realizing that she’ll never get her passport, never go to Europe, and likely spend the rest of her days locked in the trunk, Lucy bursts into tears. Doc Peterson cheers her up by remembering a song that he taught her when she was a child.

And so, with Lucy singing ‘Skip to My Lou‘ from inside the trunk, and Doc Peterson dancing a jolly little jig, a perfect opportunity presents itself for Ricky to burst into the apartment with a classic, “What’s going on here?!”

And I was going where with this?

Skip To My Lou quilt: by way of sample blocks with an assist from Lucy Ricardo.

ribbon swirl quiltingI’ve spent a lot of time lately – when not rerunning old sitcoms in my head; cleaning the sewing room, and culling and organizing fabric, including some much needed rearranging of storage furniture and worktables. The cleaning, sorting and organizing went fairly smoothly.  I’d reached the point where I could stand back and admire my hard work – all except for three boxes.  What was in those boxes you ask?

Stuff that hadn’t been unpacked since we moved to Oklahoma (cough… thirteen years ago). If pressed to admit the truth, those boxes had been packed up when we left Texas and relocated to Colorado, and then from Colorado to Oklahoma. A time capsule of quilting ‘stuff’, untouched by human hands for centuries… um, maybe let’s just say years.

applique orphan block doodle quiltingThere were orphan blocks and sample blocks and vintage coverlets, but mainly lots of sample blocks.  Sample blocks from my earliest quilting days when I still regularly made sample blocks.  And I clearly remember saying to myself, “Save these, you’ll be able to make an entire quilt with a stockpile of sample blocks someday.”

Well, that someday never came until those blocks and I had traveled down a long, long road together.

I had two choices: pitch ’em or use ’em. Of course I went with the opportunity to procrastinate, and so the cleaning, and the culling, and the organizing, and the generally satisfied feeling of a job being well done went right out the window.

orphan block sampler quilt checkered doodle quiltingSometimes when faced with orphan blocks, the blocks seem to stare right back at me through an (imaginary) hole in an old vaudeville trunk, saying, ‘Here’s my eye. Here’s my other eye. Here’s my nose. Here’s my mouth’, and I can’t see enough of anything that will suggest a way for the blocks to come together.

But making this little quilt was one of those moments when the blocks and I didn’t end up in a standoff, they very nearly jumped into place themselves.

And the truly amazing part of this sampler?  Only one – count ’em one – inset seam. How ever did that happen? Dunno. Some days, and some quilts, just go skipping along like that – even quilts made by a crazy lady who can take a life lesson from an episode of I Love Lucy©.

orphan blocks sampler little quiltstars applique doodle quilting

Feeling A Wee Bit White Rabbit-ish

Lately, I find that I’m often running behind myself, but this is my big chance to play a little catch up.  Here are blocks thirty-four through thirty seven in the Grandmother’s Choice quilt project, in clockwise order: Coffee Cup, Granny’s Choice, (Not A) Sunbonnet Baby, and Nameless Star.

mosaic

I wasn’t crazy-happy with two of the suggested blocks in the last four weeks – first up, there was the Coffee Cup block, which was a pieced cup and saucer with an appliqued cup handle.  It seemed more mug than cup, so I opted to draft my own applique block instead – a fairly easy fix.

Then there was the Sunbonnet Baby (groan).  My godmother’s mother was either a close friend or perhaps simply a pen pal of Bertha Corbett, creator of the Sunbonnet Baby.  For whatever reason, the two women corresponded, and several of Corbett’s letters were carefully preserved, framed, and proudly displayed on the ‘wall of shame’ in their family room.  Here’s an example of what the letters looked like, the only difference being the content.

Owing to my early, and unavoidable exposure, I managed to develop an overwhelming sense of twee with all things connected with a Sunbonnet Baby (seriously, there was no way to get around seeing the Corbett letters, when all I really wanted to do was watch the Wallace and Ladmo Show on television).  Imagine my dismay when I saw that block thirty-six was an homage to those very same little darlings.  I simply could not go along with that plan.  In the words of Frank Morgan who played the palace guard in The Wizard of Oz, “Not no way!  Not no how!”  Blasphemous as it may seem, I have fairly strong feelings on this subject, as you may have guessed.

The theme of week thirty-six was Testament of Youth, and instead of a Sunbonnet Baby (shudder), I opted for a block designed by Aileen Bullard and published in the Kansas City Star in 1932.  The original block called for yarn ringlets (probably à la Shirley Temple), but yeah, I had to fix that, too.  The block is very cute any way you look at it, but it’s a cuteness that I can live with.

Granny’s Choice was a breeze, and I think that it made up into a really interesting finished block.  I enjoy looking at blocks that suggest a whirly-twirly kind of movement, and the blades in this block certainly do that – I can easily imagine using the Granny’s Choice pattern for an entire quilt.

Nameless Star was a fun block to plan and piece as well.  But… there I was, face-to-face yet again with a large, plain center patch – and so help me, I cannot resist tweaking those large expanses of fabric.  A pinwheel center seemed the proper way to go.

Backtracking for a minute

So who, exactly, were Wallace and Ladmo?  Oh my, what you missed not growing up with that wacky duo.  It was kid TV at it’s best, a program that ran for 35 years (April 1, 1954 to December 29, 1989) on KPHO-TV Channel 5, in Phoenix, Arizona.

The name morphed over the years, beginning with It’s Wallace?, updated later to Wallace & Company, and finally finishing up as The Wallace and Ladmo Show.  No matter which title ran in the opening credits, it became one of the longest running, locally produced children’s television shows earning nine Emmy awards in the process.

I think, perhaps, that I’ll save the full story of Bill Thompson (Wallace) and Ladimir Kwiatkowski (Ladmo) for another day.

Wallace and Ladmo

Block Twenty-Four: True Blue

I’ll try very hard to keep a lid on things today.  Barbara Brackman’s latest block, True Blue, recalls the term bluestocking which was applied to women (and men) of the 18th century.  Specifically, women that formed literary clubs.

Bluestocking (noun): a woman having intellectual or literary interests.  — Merriam-Webster

And we all know what happens when you educate a woman, they invariably begin to form opinions and get ideas of their own.  Ideas bigger than what’s for supper.  Bigger even than whether or not in their opinion broccoli is superior to green beans.  Next thing you know, they’ll want to discuss more than books or poems, they may actually become knowledgeable about finances and politics… my, my, my.

True Blue Barbara Brackman Fight For Womens Rights Quilt Grandmother's ChoiceI did promise to keep a lid on it, didn’t I?  Oh, well.

Today’s block was a super easy block to complete, and a good thing for me that it was.  Another member of our Flickr group sent up a red flag on the instructions.  The block finished over-sized instead of at 8 1/2 inches (sigh).  So, it was a pencil, graph paper, and calculator for me this morning.

More distressing news, I’ve caught the bug – the Downton Abbey bug.  I’ve finished season one and began streaming season two today.  At this rate I’ll burn through season three as soon as it’s available on Amazon Prime, and where will that leave me?  Haven’t had to deal with the not-so-patiently-waiting-foot-tapping-is-September-ever-going-to-get-here? kind of anticipation since the Kiefer Sutherland series, 24.

Shucks – I survived eight off-seasons wondering what Jack would do next without turning into some kind of zombie that sits in front of a blank TV screen tearing old magazines into thin strips – I’ll survive this as well.

It’s Shake ‘n Bake™ – And I Helped!

This morning I’m still thinking about family – and wondering about the women in particular – in conjunction with the 19th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.   I’ve been trying to imagine how becoming politically enfranchised might have impacted their lives.

For a woman of today, the opportunity to voice an opinion with a vote is something that is very often taken for granted, but enfranchisement just wasn’t always so.  It was such a short time ago that we American women gained that right.

On June 4, 1919 the 19th Amendment was passed; it was then ratified by Congress August 18, 1920.  Ninety-two years ago this month.  In a nutshell, the amendment prohibited any U.S. citizen being denied the right to vote based on sex.

Mom… Our House Smells Funny.  New Wizard™ Air Freshener Will Cure House-itosis!

My grandmother on the paternal side of the family would have been 34 years old at that time, and if a contemporary were to describe her you would probably hear something along the line of:  Ida, wife of James, mother of four, homemaker.  All you would need to encapsulate her life for a headstone would be to insert “faithful” and/or “beloved” somewhere.

James and Ida

Now really, looking at the woman in this photo (pictured with her husband James who always looks to me like the proverbial cat that ate the canary), do you think she’d willingly let herself be limited by that definition?  I’d like to think she wouldn’t.

ring around the collar!  RING AROUND THE COLLAR!!

If we switch over to the distaff side of the family, you might be interested to hear about Dr. Ella Green Ware, my first cousin twice removed.  Ella was 50 years old at the time we’re talking about and had already been practicing medicine as a country doctor for twenty-one years.

Ella was the first woman in the state of Texas to practice medicine after graduation from the University of Texas Medical School at Galveston in 1899.  It was said that she had been offered a prestigious professorship, something more suited to a lady doctor, but the position was gratefully declined.  (Note: other sources disagree with the graduation date of 1899.  Karen Mac Smith in her book On The Watershed Of The Ecleto And The Clear Fork Sandies cites the date as 1898.)

Dr. Ella Green Ware

Encouraged by her father, Ella stepped outside of the traditional boundaries set for a women of the day.  During the fifty years she practiced, she not only delivered 6,000 babies, but treated injuries and illnesses as any male doctor would.

Who Jacked This Post And Reminds Us Of Stereotyped Women And Bad TV Commercials?

Would the ratification of the 19th Amendment have changed anything in a woman’s day-to-day life?  Probably not.  But it would certainly have influenced, I think at least subconsciously, how they raised and educated their children, more specifically their daughters, to believe that exercising their hard-won right to vote could help to make a difference.